NaturalHealing


Vitamins: To Be or Not to Be?
May 1, 2006, 2:44 pm
Filed under: Vitamins

Nutrition as it applies to our daily lives means that we take in what we need to maintain our body’s healthy state.  Nutrition has become an important word thanks to the involvement of the USDA in our daily food requirements, and the FDA’s involvement in determining what is and is not dangerous for us to consume.

 But what is our responsibility in the nutrition game?  Do we understand what our nutritional requirements are, how to fulfill those requirements, and how to look for real nutritional value in our foods?  I’m not sure that nutrition has been successfully addressed in its own right.  We hear nutrition in relation to our vitamin intake, our fortified cereals and milk, and in the context that we need “nutritional value” from our food choices.  But we don’t often stop to think, what do we really need in nutritional supplements?

 Vitamins and minerals are more readily available to us than ever before, and we’re still no better equipped to actually determine what we need to take, than we were forty years ago.  Just because we see the latest advertisement about a particular vitamin and decide the symptoms of deficiency apply to us, does not mean we need to rush out and purchase the product.  The symptoms of deficiency for lots of vitamins and minerals are the same or overlapping.  What we need is a way to detect, on an individual basis, what our body’s lack, and then plan a suggested nutritional solution.

 The complete lack of unity between our medical field and the herbal field, (this is the field that vitamins and minerals belong to) is a disgrace in a country so forward thinking as the United States.  But it is also where we fall short in providing our citizenry with the tools they need to make better, informed decisions.  The medical field has long resented any contact that patients might make with herbalists, vitamins and minerals, or any other proposed health aid, that wasn’t directly related to medicine. 

 Thanks to this prevalent attitude among most all doctors, we have missed great opportunities to advance a generation’s health.  If you were to take a cross section of the population, and check for adequate levels of the most used and fortified vitamins and minerals, you would probably find the as high as 80% or the population is lacking in a least one of the vitamins and minerals.  Now, that doesn’t sound too bad, until you stop to think, what if it’s calcium?  A calcium deficiency brings on osteoporosis, a deteriorating of the bone.  This disease alone costs millions in medical expense to the population.

 Can you see how a little more cooperation and open-minded participation on the part of our medical field could result in far fewer health problems?  It would also have provided the general population with a viable way to discern their vitamin and mineral needs, accurately.  Blood tests, urine tests, and other simple office procedures would provide the vast majority of the information needed for us to arm ourselves, and head off to the health store.  Preventive medicine comes in all shapes, forms, and tablets!
 



Preventing High Blood Pressure
May 1, 2006, 2:19 pm
Filed under: High Blood Pressure

No doubt, there are number of treatments and medicines available for the treatment of high blood pressure. But as it is said, "Precaution is better than cure".  So, we must consider this saying and follow the recommended rules in order to prevent the high blood pressure.

Blood pressure is directly proportional to the body weight; it means that if your weight increases the blood pressure also rises. Overweight people have an increased risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, and other illnesses. Losing weight reduces the risk Even if you don't have high or low blood pressure problems due to being overweight, a healthy weight can help you feel active and lower your risk of blood pressure and other diseases.
It's not just how much you weigh that's important: It also matters where your body stores extra fat. Just like the other things your body shape is also inherited from your parents. Some people are "Apple-shaped"; these have extra fat at the waist while others are "pear shaped" having more fat at their hips and thighs. The former have higher health risks than the later.
Anyways, wherever that extra weight is you can still prevent it and control your blood pressure. Even if you are already captured by the high blood pressure; no problem just start loosing wait and it will help you lower your pressure.
To loose weight, you should use up more calories than you eat. You need to use up the day's calories and some of the calories stored in your body fat. Eating 300 to 500 calories less per day, may lead to losing between one and two pounds per week. This is a realistic weight loss. It may seem slow, but would add up to a weight loss of more than three stone in a year.
Increase your physical activity if you really want to loose your weight. Being active controls your weight 10 times by eating less. Besides losing weight, there are other reasons to be more active: Being physically active can help lower high blood pressure and your total cholesterol level while raising HDL-cholesterol, and reduces your risk for heart disease. Physically active people have a lower risk of getting high blood pressure (20% to 50% lower) than inactive people.
You are not being asked to join a gym but at least try to fit various physical activities into your daily routine in small but important ways. If light physical activities done on regular basis can reduce the risk of blood pressure and heart disease.
Do at least 30 minutes of exercise like swimming or running. If you don't have 30 minutes for exercising, try to find two 15-minute periods or even three 10-minute periods. Try to do some type of aerobic activity in the course of a week or try brisk walking, most days of the week. These exercises can condition your heart and lungs and can prevent you from diseases.
Most people don't need to see a doctor before they start exercising, since a gradual, sensible exercise program has few health risks. But in case of any health problem like, heart disease, blood pressure problem or any other you should first consult your physician. Your doctor or other health worker can help you set sensible goals based on a proper weight for your height, build and age and help you prevent high blood pressure. Men and very active women may need up to 2,500 calories daily. Other women and inactive men need only about 2,000 calories daily. A safe plan is to eat 300 to 500 fewer calories a day to lose 1 to 2 pounds a week.